What Do Teachers Do When They Say They Are Doing Learning Rounds? Scotland’s Experience of Instructional Rounds

Carey Philpott, Catriona Oates


APA 6th edition
Philpott, C., & Oates, C. (2015). What Do Teachers Do When They Say They Are Doing Learning Rounds? Scotland’s Experience of Instructional Rounds. European Journal of Educational Research, 4(1), 22-37. doi:10.12973/eu-jer.4.1.22

Harvard
Philpott C., and Oates C. 2015 'What Do Teachers Do When They Say They Are Doing Learning Rounds? Scotland’s Experience of Instructional Rounds', European Journal of Educational Research , vol. 4, no. 1, pp. 22-37. Available from: http://dx.doi.org/10.12973/eu-jer.4.1.22

Chicago 16th edition
Philpott, Carey and Oates, Catriona . "What Do Teachers Do When They Say They Are Doing Learning Rounds? Scotland’s Experience of Instructional Rounds". (2015)European Journal of Educational Research 4, no. 1(2015): 22-37. doi:10.12973/eu-jer.4.1.22

Abstract

This paper reports on research into the practice of learning rounds in Scotland. Learning rounds are a form of collaborative professional development for teachers based on the instructional rounds practice developed in the USA. In recent years learning rounds have gained high profile official support within education in Scotland. The research finds that what teachers in Scotland do when they say they are do-ing learning rounds varies widely from school to school and deviates significantly from the practice of instructional rounds. The implications of this for who is learning what in the practice of learning rounds is considered. The wider implications of the Scottish experience for the development of in-structional rounds practice in other countries is also considered as are the implications for promoting collaborative professional development practice more generally.

Keywords: Instructional rounds, learning rounds, collaborative professional development


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