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preschool social conventional transgressions social development young children

Young Children’s Responses to Social-Conventional Transgressions in Japanese Preschool Settings

Ai Mizokawa , Motoyuki Nakaya , Asuka Nomura

This study investigated young children’s recognition of social rules and responses to social-conventional transgressions in Japanese preschool s.


  • Pub. date: July 15, 2024
  • Online Pub. date: February 09, 2024
  • Pages: 1019-1029
  • 106 Downloads
  • 239 Views
  • 0 Citations
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This study investigated young children’s recognition of social rules and responses to social-conventional transgressions in Japanese preschool settings. One hundred twenty-six children aged three to six years old heard four hypothetical stories that describe typical social-conventional transgressions in Japanese preschools. They were asked about their feelings when they witnessed each transgression (emotional response), whether they thought it was better to follow social rules and act like everyone else (social convention judgment), their justification for the judgment, and their willingness to play with the transgressor (interaction judgment). Most participants in all age groups valued following social rules and judged that the transgressor should act like everyone else, but five-year-olds generated more group- and other-oriented justifications for the judgment. Although there were no significant age group differences in interaction judgment, further analysis showed that three-year-olds’ willingness to play with the transgressor was positively related to their positive emotion, whereas such relationships were not found in four- and five-year-olds. The results demonstrate that Japanese children’s responses to social-conventional transgressions become more social and complex throughout young childhood in the Japanese cultural context.

Keywords: Preschool, social-conventional transgressions, social development, young children.

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